No food or drink, no parties and only 30 people allowed: new UK guidance on weddings

29th June 2020   •   article
by Sunny Hundal
Twitter @sunny_hundal.
Credit: Photo by freestocks on Unsplash
The UK government will allow larger weddings to take place from 4th July but with strong restrictions in place, according to new guidance.

From next week more types of businesses and public places such as libraries and places of worship will be allowed to open. They will all be expected to follow COVID-19 Secure guidelines.

The UK is slowly coming out of lockdown in phases.

From 4th July, weddings and civil partnerships in England will be allowed with only 30 guests maximum. Other parts of the UK such as Scotland and Wales may impose slightly different rules.

The services should be as short as possible and limited to parts that make the marriage or partnership legally binding.

Government guidelines also state that no food, drinks or singing and partying will be allowed at weddings. In addition, social distancing between people must be maintained.

Full guidelines that apply to weddings are below:

  • No more than 30 people should attend.

  • Social distancing should be practiced and face masks worn.

  • People should wash their hands before and after exchanging rings.

  • No food or drink should be consumed as part of the event.

  • People should avoid singing, shouting, raising voices or playing loud music. Shouting or singing can increase risk of virus transmission.

  • If needed, one person can sing or chant - but they should be behind a plexi-glass screen to protect guests.

  • Spoken responses during the service should not be done in a raised voice.

  • Musical instruments that require blowing such as trumpets or horns should be avoided.

  • Avoid if possible: face-to-face seating, sitting with lots of people in enclosed spaces, badly ventilated rooms.

  • Any washing or ablution rituals should not be done at the venue and should instead take place before arrival.

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Sunny Hundal has been a journalist and commentator since 2004. He is editor-in-chief of Barfi Culture
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