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More white people were arrested by UK counter-terror police than Islamists last year
By: Barfi Culture Team
Published: 13th September 2018

New figures show that more white suspects were arrested over terror-related offences in the UK than those from Asian backgrounds. It is the first time since the London bombings of 2005 this has happened.

The figures from the Home Office (PDF) illustrate the growing threat of violent far-right extremism in Britain.

The Home Office report says white suspects accounted for 38% of terror related arrests, while those of Asian ethnicity accounted for 37% of arrests. Black suspects were 9% of all terror-related arrests. (It was first reported in the Independent)

"In the latest year there was an increase in the proportion of those of both White and of Other ethnic appearance," the report said.

"This was the first time, since the year ending June 2005, that the proportion of white people arrested has exceeded the proportion of Asian people arrested," it added.

The number of people arrested for terror-related offences is still historically high, according to the report.



Last year saw a jump in Islamist activity and arrests after the London and Manchester terror bombings.

After the violent extremist group National Action (pictured) were banned in December 2016, a number of its members were arrested last year by counter-terror police. Some were serving in the British Army.

A few week ago, the National Counter-Terrorism Police Lead until 2018, told BBC Newsnight (video below) that Britain hadn't yet "woken up" to the extreme right-wing threat yet.

The vast majority of prisoners held for terrorism-related offences are Islamists (82%). So far only 13% of prisoners are in custody over far-right activity and the rest over other issues.

But in coming years this make-up of prisoners is likely to change.



Article published on 13th September 2018 in the Crime section




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